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Halloween Cat Safety Tips

By PetcoBlogger on Oct. 4, 2017

CatHalloween_Body.jpgHalloween can pose real dangers for your cat. Chocolate poisoning, stress, burns caused by carelessly situated jack-o’-lanterns and escapes from your house are all potential hazards. Outdoors, your cat could become the victim of a Halloween “prank” or get lost. Many of the Halloween activities many of us love can prove perilous to felines. Whether you’re greeting children at the door or hosting a party, the change in routine can be stressful for your cat. All of the additional activity at the door also allows a resourceful feline a chance to explore the outdoors. cat-in-pumpkin-costume.jpg

How to keep your cat safe
Keeping your cat indoors and supervised is the safest solution. Set up a special area in a bedroom or other space that is off-limits to guests and away from trick-or-treaters. Soft music or the TV can drown out scary sounds and spooky music. Provide a blanket, food, water, litter box and favorite toys, then close the door and let her spend Halloween in peace and safety. Additional precautions:

  • Candy: Often, trick-or-treaters will dump out their treats onto the floor to evaluate their candy “haul”. Unfortunately, chocolate contains an ingredient that can diminish the blood flow to the brain and cause heart attacks and a variety of other life-threatening problems for cats. As a rule, the darker the chocolate, the more lethal. Small candy can also be a choking hazard and can be harmful to your cat’s teeth. Keep chocolate and all other candy away from your pet and advise children and other household members not to offer it as a treat. Also have your veterinarian’s number and the phone number for the ASPCA Poison Control Center (888) 426-4435* handy at all times. (*Be advised that there is a charge for this call. Please ask for the cost before proceeding).
  • Escapes: In case someone inadvertently opens the door to your cat’s “safe-room,” make sure she is wearing a collar with an ID tag. A glow-in-the-dark collar and tag are ideal. These will help you spot her more quickly if she does slip out, and will make her more visible to motorists. Microchip ID tags are another effective and permanent way to ensure your cat is returned to you if she ever escapes or gets lost.
  • Wrapping: Are you renowned for the homemade popcorn balls you hand out to trick-or-treaters? If you lovingly wrap each treat in plastic or tin foil, be careful. If ingested, these wrappings can cause a blockage in your pet’s stomach, creating a life-threatening situation.
  • Decorations: If Halloween is a major decorating holiday for your family, be aware that cobwebs and plastic or glass ornaments can be a hazard. If ingested, shards from a broken ornament can puncture an intestinal wall. Vacuum or sweep floors immediately after decorating and cover electrical cords to prevent possible shock or electrocution.
  • Candles: A careless swipe of the tail, the pat of a curious paw or a nose that gets too close can result in singed fur and whiskers or a more serious burn. Make sure to place candles and jack-o’-lanterns well out of your cat’s reach.
  • Poisons: Poisons threaten cats no matter what the season might be, but Halloween proves a particularly dangerous time. If you’re giving your home a good cleaning, make sure your cat doesn’t get into the bleach or other supplies. Remember that whatever she walks through will end up in her stomach as she licks the contaminant from her paws.

What to do in the event of: 

  • Burns: Douse the affected area with cold water, apply a cool compress and contact your veterinarian immediately.
  • Stomach blockages or perforated intestines: You may not notice these conditions immediately. Rather, a day or two after your cat ingests a harmful object, you’ll see a change in eating habits and litter box habits. If you notice a string protruding from your cat’s mouth or anus, do not remove it. Your attempt to do so may further injure her intestines. In either situation, contact your veterinarian immediately.
  • Poisoning or chocolate toxicity: Your cat may grow supersensitive to stimuli such as light, noise and sound, or her pupils may dilate. Other symptoms include a rapid heartbeat, muscle tremors, seizures, vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity or difficulty breathing. Contact your veterinarian or the Pet Poison Control Center at 1-888-426-4435 immediately if you notice any unusual symptoms in your cat. Collect a sample of the substance consumed, as well as any vomit or feces expelled, as you will need to take these with you to the veterinarian’s office.
  • Lost cat: A collar with an ID tag is a must if you allow your cat to go outdoors, and is recommended for indoor cats as well in case they get out. A microchip ID tag is also a great way to permanently equip your cat with vital contact information should she ever become lost. If your pet becomes lost, post flyers in your neighborhood right away and contact local veterinarians and shelters.

Learn more about how to help keep your pets safe on Halloween. After all, Halloween is better when you celebrate with your pets! You can also check out our Halloween Bootique for scary savings on pet Halloween costumes!

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2 Comments
Comments
by LL
‎10-28-2016 08:00 AM

Just saw the "black cat event" site sale. Although we think our black cat is good luck, we all know they are long associated with bad luck and the dark side, and the most euthanized at shelters. Very disapointed this was posted right before Halloween. You guys should know better. We are now former customers!

Just saw the "black cat event" site sale. Although we think our black cat is good luck, we all know they are long associated with bad luck and the dark side, and the most euthanized at shelters. Very disapointed this was posted right before Halloween. You guys should know better. We are now former customers!

Posted on Oct. 28, 2016
by AnnabelleKitten
‎10-28-2016 12:23 PM

Our little black cat can't wait for us to pick her up some new goodies from the "black cat event". Cat Very Happy 

I see some new toys in her future!

 

And thanks for posting this article. My friend's cat got out of the house during a Halloween party last year. Luckily, she didn't go very far and everything was OK, but from now on they've decided to keep her safe in their bedroom during any sort of event at their home. 

Our little black cat can't wait for us to pick her up some new goodies from the "black cat event". Cat Very Happy 

I see some new toys in her future!

 

And thanks for posting this article. My friend's cat got out of the house during a Halloween party last year. Luckily, she didn't go very far and everything was OK, but from now on they've decided to keep her safe in their bedroom during any sort of event at their home. 

Posted on Oct. 28, 2016
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