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Do You Know the Grooming Needs of Your Dog's Breed?

By PetcoBlogger on Jul. 11, 2017

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How often you should brush, comb or treat your dog to a spa day depends on their coat and lifestyle. Typically, dogs with longer hair or more active lifestyles require more frequent grooming. 

Check out the descriptions below to determine your dog’s coat type. (Keep in mind that these guidelines will apply to your puppy’s adult coat.) If she’s a mixed breed, go with the category that matches her dominant breed.

If, after reading this, you decide that DIY is too much work, schedule a salon appointment with one of our Petco Certified Stylists. We have many grooming packages from which to choose!

Learn more about the different type of brushes and deshedding tools here

Short and Wiry: Terriers, airedales, schnauzers and wirehaired dachshunds have short, coarse coats with fur that is thick and hard with a longer softer coat on their backs.

  • Tools: Slicker brush; medium-tooth comb.
  • Frequency: Twice a week.
  • Method: To remove loose hair and prevent mats, brush and comb in layers from the skin outward in the direction of the fur.
  • Special needs: Grooming by a professional groomer every six to eight weeks.

Short and Smooth: This coat type has little to no undercoat and is sported by such breeds as basenjis, doberman pinschers and pugs.

  • Tools: Bristle brush or hound glove.
  • Frequency: Once a week.
  • Method: First brush against the hair growth, which will help to remove the loose hair, and then brush with the growth to flatten and help spread natural oils.
  • Special needs: Spray-on conditioners can help keep your dog’s coat shiny. Grooming by a professional groomer four to six times a year.

Short and Double: Labrador retrievers, rottweiler and similar breeds grow a short, double coat. The top coat is straight and coarse, while the undercoat is soft and thin.

  • Tools: Slicker, Furminator, pin brush and metal comb.
  • Frequency: Twice a week; more frequently in spring and summer when shedding.
  • Method: Brush the coat growth to prevent mats and remove excess loose undercoat, then use a metal comb to remove the loose hair.
  • Special needs: Grooming by a professional groomer six times a year.

Long and Silky: Breeds with this coat type, including maltese, silky terriers and yorkshire terriers, don’t grow an undercoat.

  • Tools: Slicker brush; fine-tooth comb.
  • Frequency: Three or four times a week.
  • Method: After removing any mats and tangles, brush then comb the entire coat in the direction the hair grows.
  • Special needs: Grooming by a professional groomer every four to six weeks.

Long and Coarse: Lhasa apsos, shih tzus and tibetan terriers are examples of breeds with long, coarse coats. This type has a thinner, lighter undercoat than long and double types.

  • Tools: Slicker brush, bristle brush, pin brush & fine-tooth comb.
  • Frequency: Three or four times a week.
  • Method: Carefully remove any mats with a slicker brush, and then brush the entire coat with a pin brush or a bristle brush. Once brushed, used a metal comb to go back and check for mats. Always brush in the direction of the hair growth.
  • Special needs: Grooming by a professional groomer every four to six weeks.

Long and Double: This long-haired type features a straight, course outer coat with a thick, heavy undercoat. Breeds include chows, collies and samoyeds.

  • Tools: Slicker brush; large, wide-tooth comb.
  • Frequency: Two or three times a week.
  • Method: Brush the entire body from the skin outward. You may want to work on one small section of fur at a time. After carefully removing any mats, thoroughly comb the coat. Make sure you get the comb next to the skin and comb outward to remove the loose undercoat.
  • Special needs: Grooming by a professional groomer six times per year. Dogs with this coat shed more than any other type, so frequent brushing is essential.

Curly: Poodles, bedlington terriers and kerry blue terriers have curly coats. Although these dogs don’t shed, their fur mats easily.

  • Tools: Slicker brush and metal comb.
  • Frequency: Twice a week.
  • Method: Brush in small sections with the grain of the coat to remove any tangles or mats, then go back and check with a metal comb.
  • Special needs: Grooming by a professional groomer every four to six weeks.

Hairless: Some hairless breeds, like the Chinese crested, grow tufts of hair on the head, legs and tail.

  • Tools: Bristle brush or hound glove.
  • Frequency: Every other week.
  • Method: Gently brush in the direction the coat grows, this will help to distribute natural oils onto skin and coat.
  • Special needs: Apply an oil-free moisturizer daily and a sunscreen with a minimum SPF 15 when outdoors.

Want some pro tips? Watch what we learned at the Westminster Dog Show:

Your dog's coat can be an indicator for general health. With proper care, nutrition and grooming, your dog can live a long and healthy life beside your side. 

Somebody's in the mood for a bath! Time for a new shampoo or two!

Check out these clippers and shears and other cool grooming accessories.

Saw a flea? Just thinking about them makes us itch. Let us help you fix that.

Now, for a new tee, hat or sunglasses and your pet's new "look" is complete!

 

2 Comments
Comments
by Leila Dorari
‎07-11-2017 02:50 AM

A very informative article! I have a short-furred mixed breed dog with straight and coarse coat and always have problems with too much hair falling down...will try these tips!

A very informative article! I have a short-furred mixed breed dog with straight and coarse coat and always have problems with too much hair falling down...will try these tips!

Posted on Jul. 11, 2017
by The Barkmore House
‎07-11-2017 05:37 AM

Effective advice!! We enjoyed reading it. Thanks for share! 

Effective advice!! We enjoyed reading it. Thanks for share! 

Posted on Jul. 11, 2017
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