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Better Betta Care for Happy, Healthy Fish

By Leah_Pet on May. 25, 2016

There’s a reason people of all types love bettas. Sometimes called Siamese fighting fish, these feisty fish pack a lot of personality into a very small package and make great pets for almost every living situation. You’ll find them right at home on a desk at the office, enhancing the look of a living room or bringing some welcome life lessons into the classroom.

Available in a wide variety of colors, these beautiful fish are one of the easier freshwater fish to care for – making them a popular choice for beginning aquatic hobbyists. If you’ve been considering adding a betta fish to your home, first you’ll need to decide which type of betta you’d prefer. Most people tend to choose a male as their first betta as they’re more striking in appearance. The main differences between the males are their color and their tails. They can have short tails, veil tails, double tails and possibly the most impressive of all – the crowntails. From a color standpoint, you’ll usually be able to have your pick of vibrant red, blue, green, yellow, white, black and more. Another popular fish that’s similar to bettas in care, looks and personality is the paradise fish. It’s well worth checking them out in addition to Siamese fighting fish to see if you’d prefer to start out with one of these captivating fish instead.

Female bettas make just as interesting of pets as the males but are muted in their coloring and have tails that are somewhat plain and smaller than the males'. As they’re less aggressive, they’ll have an easier time living with other fish and can successfully be kept in a community environment as long as you choose compatible fish. Use caution, however, as some of them can get belligerent. They must be monitored a lot, especially at first, to ensure they’re not picking on their tank mates.

Once you’ve decided what kind of betta to get (male or female), you’ll want to select and set up a tank that best suits your fish, while also complementing your décor. Bettas have gained a lot of popularity for their ability to live in smaller tanks but tend to thrive in tanks that are five gallons or larger. Although a larger tank takes a little bit more work to set up initially, it pays off in the long run as water changes are easier and fish tend to stay healthier.

The accompanying infographic is packed with care tips and facts to walk you through each step of caring for your betta – from setting up the tank to proper feeding schedules and maintaining water quality.

There is one vital thing to note if you want to sound like a betta pro from the get-go. Many people commonly say “bay-tuh” (count me in as guilty of this!) but true betta enthusiasts know that the proper pronunciation is “bet-ta”, like the word “bet.” The mispronunciation is so common at this point that most people will know what you’re talking about no matter how you say it but purists know “bet-ta” is better.

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If you’re just dipping your toes into the water of freshwater fish care, be sure to check out this freshwater fish compatibility blog to learn a little more about these intriguing underwater creatures.

To see more freshwater fish for beginners, check out Live Aquaria

6 Comments
Comments
by Q7XR2
‎05-25-2016 10:44 AM
Nice article. Wish we could get this in the stores.
Nice article. Wish we could get this in the stores.
Posted on May. 25, 2016
by
‎05-25-2016 12:22 PM
Nah...you want one that's accurate...for instance you should never...NEVER...put a Betts of either sex in a community tank. Even if they can coexist with other fish without killing them, thebetta will be constantly stressed from having to be on alert full time with all the movement.
Nah...you want one that's accurate...for instance you should never...NEVER...put a Betts of either sex in a community tank. Even if they can coexist with other fish without killing them, thebetta will be constantly stressed from having to be on alert full time with all the movement.
Posted on May. 25, 2016
by MB
‎05-25-2016 06:56 PM
I agree with another commenter. Before I knew better I put a male betta in a community tank and he kept aggressively charging the other fish. He was moved real fast to another tank of his own. More recently I put 2 bee shrimp in with a female. She was not pleased.
I agree with another commenter. Before I knew better I put a male betta in a community tank and he kept aggressively charging the other fish. He was moved real fast to another tank of his own. More recently I put 2 bee shrimp in with a female. She was not pleased.
Posted on May. 25, 2016
by Cwiley
‎06-09-2016 08:22 AM
If you don't think bettas do good in community tanks I advise you join the group betta fish keepers on Facebook. You're wrong. Bettas can be kept in community tanks and be perfectly happy. It depends on the bettas temperament. Females do best in groups of 5 or more Depending on how many gallons your tank is. 5 girls is the maximum for a 10 gallon tho!
If you don't think bettas do good in community tanks I advise you join the group betta fish keepers on Facebook. You're wrong. Bettas can be kept in community tanks and be perfectly happy. It depends on the bettas temperament. Females do best in groups of 5 or more Depending on how many gallons your tank is. 5 girls is the maximum for a 10 gallon tho!
Posted on Jun. 9, 2016
by Jacob
‎06-17-2016 01:29 PM

Never put male bettas with any other than tiny snails, such as pond snails (ew gross) or sun thorn nerites. Female bettas do well in 5-6+ with other low-flow fish, such as peacock gobies, cory cats, etc. I like females in the community tank, you can find some really beautiful ones out there. 

Never put male bettas with any other than tiny snails, such as pond snails (ew gross) or sun thorn nerites. Female bettas do well in 5-6+ with other low-flow fish, such as peacock gobies, cory cats, etc. I like females in the community tank, you can find some really beautiful ones out there. 

Posted on Jun. 17, 2016
by
‎07-09-2016 05:30 AM
This appears to be a informative site only problem the wording is soooooo small i cant read it. Guess i will have to find another site. Im sad !
This appears to be a informative site only problem the wording is soooooo small i cant read it. Guess i will have to find another site. Im sad !
Posted on Jul. 9, 2016
About the Author
  • As a child Leah used to write in her journal about how she’d like to be an animal when she grew up. As luck would have it, she grew up to be a writer who writes about animals instead. She has worked in veterinarian clinics, had pets of all types and has fostered many cats and dogs. Currently she lives with two cats named Irma and Yuyu and feeds a bevvy of semi-feral neighborhood cats.
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